buy flexaril muscle relaxer

How It Works

If you are suffering from muscle spasms, Flexeril can provide effective relief. Instead of affecting the spinal cord or the actual muscles, Flexeril directly affects the brain stem. Therefore, the medication is only used to alleviate muscle spasms caused by problems with the muscles, rather than ones resulting from problems in the brain or spinal cord.

Benefits of Flexeril

  • Alleviates tender, stiff or painful muscle-related problems
  • Reduces muscle-related pain
  • Treats muscle spasms

Taking Flexeril

Make sure to follow your doctor’s recommendations when taking Flexeril; it is usually prescribed as oral tablets that should be taken three times every day. However, your doctor may increase or decrease this dosage according to your particular medical condition. You should also be aware that severe side effects may result from increasing the dose.

Never take Flexeril for longer than three weeks, as it is intended only as a short-term solution. At the end of the three weeks, visit your physician if you do not notice an improvement.

What is Generic Flexeril?

Flexeril is a very popular treatment option prescribed by health care professionals to individuals who are suffering from muscle-related pain.  This can include a muscle injury, muscle strains and muscle sprains.  The problem is that the muscle relaxant can also be very expensive to buy.  Fortunately, that is no longer the case thanks to a generic version of the brand name drug called generic Flexeril.  This medication works in the same way as regular Flexeril, but it costs a lot less.  Generic Flexeril relieves the muscle spasms that cause pain by affecting the central nervous system.  They are often prescribed in combination with rest and/or physical therapy.

Dosing Information for Generic Flexeril

The oral pills come in 5 and 10 mg tablets, as well as 15 and 30 mg extended release capsules.  You need to follow the exact dosing information provided by your doctor. However, most patients are prescribed 5 or 10 mg of the pills three times daily for regular tablets.  If you are taking extended release tablets, you will usually be required to take 15 or 30 mg of the medication each day to relieve your muscle pain.  Generic Flexeril is also not recommended for long-term use.  Most patients take the pills for two to three weeks maximum.  Be sure to talk to your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding before taking the medication.

Benefits of Generic Flexeril

The main benefit of generic Flexeril is the lower price.  You may be surprised at just how much less the generic version of a brand name drug will cost. You can save a lot of money on your muscle relaxant pills if you purchase the generic version instead.  They are proven to be equally effective and safe as their brand name counterparts, so the only main difference is the lower amount you will have to pay to purchase them.

Buying Generic Flexeril Online

It is important to realize that you now have the option to buy generic Flexeril online.  Many pharmacies on the Internet sell the drug at an even lower cost than regular pharmacies.  This can save you even more money.  Another advantage is the fact that you will not have to make numerous trips to your doctor’s office and local pharmacy to obtain a prescription.  Online pharmacies are able to sell generic Flexeril without a prescription.  Therefore, you can buy generic Flexeril online without even leaving the comfort of your own home.  Treating your muscle pain has never been easier.

Flexeril 90 tablets of cyclobenzaprine 10mg

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Can you get high off Flexeril?

Can you get high off Flexeril?

  • Do not take with alcohol. It can cause heart problems if you do.

    Side Effects include:

    Incidence of most common adverse reactions in the 2 double-blind‡ , placebo-controlled 5 mg studies (incidence of >3% on FLEXERIL 5 mg):

    FLEXERIL 5 mg
    N=464 FLEXERIL 10 mg
    N=249 Placebo
    N=469
    Drowsiness 29% 38% 10%
    Dry Mouth 21% 32% 7%
    Fatigue 6% 6% 3%
    Headache 5% 5% 8%

    Adverse reactions which were reported in 1% to 3% of the patients were: abdominal pain, acid regurgitation, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, nausea, irritability, mental acuity decreased, nervousness, upper respiratory infection, and pharyngitis.

    The following list of adverse reactions is based on the experience in 473 patients treated with FLEXERIL 10 mg in additional controlled clinical studies, 7607 patients in the post-marketing surveillance program, and reports received since the drug was marketed. The overall incidence of adverse reactions among patients in the surveillance program was less than the incidence in the controlled clinical studies.

    The adverse reactions reported most frequently with FLEXERIL were drowsiness, dry mouth and dizziness. The incidence of these common adverse reactions was lower in the surveillance program than in the controlled clinical studies:

    Clinical Studies
    With FLEXERIL 10 mg Surveillance Program
    With FLEXERIL 10 mg
    Drowsiness 39% 16%
    Dry Mouth 27% 7%
    Dizziness 11% 3%

    Among the less frequent adverse reactions, there was no appreciable difference in incidence in controlled clinical studies or in the surveillance program. Adverse reactions which were reported in 1% to 3% of the patients were: fatigue/tiredness, asthenia, nausea, constipation, dyspepsia, unpleasant taste, blurred vision, headache, nervousness, and confusion.
    de effects include:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclobenzaprine
    Source(s): 

Related Resources for Flexeril

Related Health

http://www.medicinenet.com/muscle_cramps/article.htm

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  • Muscle Spasms
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  • What are the possible side effects of cyclobenzaprine (Amrix, Comfort Pac with Cyclobenzaprine, Fexmid, Flexeril)?

    Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

    Stop using cyclobenzaprine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

    • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats;
    • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
    • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
    • sudden headache,…

    Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Flexeril »

    What are the precautions when taking cyclobenzaprine hcl (Flexeril)?

    Before taking cyclobenzaprine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

    Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), heart problems (such as irregular heartbeat, heart block, heart failure, recent heart attack), difficulty urinating (such as due to an enlarged prostate), glaucoma.

    This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Avoid alcoholic…

flexeril high

Cyclobenzaprine is closely related to the tricyclic antidepressants, e.g., amitriptyline and imipramine. In short term studies for indications other than muscle spasm associated with acute musculoskeletal conditions, and usually at doses somewhat greater than those recommended for skeletal muscle spasm, some of the more serious central nervous system reactions noted with the tricyclic antidepressants have occurred (see WARNINGS, below, and ADVERSE REACTIONS).

Tricyclic antidepressants have been reported to produce arrhythmias, sinus tachycardia, prolongation of the conduction time leading to myocardial infarction and stroke.

 

 

flexeril 10 mg

Brand Names: Amrix, Fexmid, Flexeril220px-Cyclobenzaprine2.svg

Flexeril®
(CYCLOBENZAPRINE HCl) Tablets
Flexeril Description

Cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride is a white, crystalline tricyclic amine salt with the empirical formula C20H21N•HCl and a molecular weight of 311.9. It has a melting point of 217˚C, and a pKa of 8.47 at 25˚C. It is freely soluble in water and alcohol, sparingly soluble in isopropanol, and insoluble in hydrocarbon solvents. If aqueous solutions are made alkaline, the free base separates. Cyclobenzaprine HCl is designated chemically as 3-(5H -dibenzo[a,d] cyclohepten-5-ylidene)-N, N-dimethyl-1-propanamine hydrochloride, and has the following structural formula:
Slideshow: Fighting the Fight: Fibromylagia Explained
Fighting the Fight: Fibromylagia Explained

Flexeril 5 mg (Cyclobenzaprine HCl) is supplied as a 5 mg tablet for oral administration. Flexeril 10 mg (Cyclobenzaprine HCl) is supplied as a 10 mg tablet for oral administration.

Flexeril 5 mg (Cyclobenzaprine HCl) tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: hydroxypropyl cellulose, hypromellose, lactose, magnesium stearate, starch, titanium dioxide, Yellow D&C #10 Aluminum Lake HT, and Yellow FD&C #6 Aluminum Lake.

Flexeril 10 mg (Cyclobenzaprine HCl) tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: hydroxypropyl cellulose, hypromellose, iron oxide, lactose, magnesium stearate, starch, and titanium dioxide.
Flexeril – Clinical Pharmacology

Cyclobenzaprine HCl relieves skeletal muscle spasm of local origin without interfering with muscle function. It is ineffective in muscle spasm due to central nervous system disease.

Cyclobenzaprine reduced or abolished skeletal muscle hyperactivity in several animal models. Animal studies indicate that cyclobenzaprine does not act at the neuromuscular junction or directly on skeletal muscle. Such studies show that cyclobenzaprine acts primarily within the central nervous system at brain stem as opposed to spinal cord levels, although its action on the latter may contribute to its overall skeletal muscle relaxant activity. Evidence suggests that the net effect of cyclobenzaprine is a reduction of tonic somatic motor activity, influencing both gamma (γ) and alpha (α) motor systems.

Pharmacological studies in animals showed a similarity between the effects of cyclobenzaprine and the structurally related tricyclic antidepressants, including reserpine antagonism, norepinephrine potentiation, potent peripheral and central anticholinergic effects, and sedation. Cyclobenzaprine caused slight to moderate increase in heart rate in animals.
Pharmacokinetics

Estimates of mean oral bioavailability of cyclobenzaprine range from 33% to 55%. Cyclobenzaprine exhibits linear pharmacokinetics over the dose range 2.5 mg to 10 mg, and is subject to enterohepatic circulation. It is highly bound to plasma proteins. Drug accumulates when dosed three times a day, reaching steady-state within 3-4 days at plasma concentrations about four-fold higher than after a single dose. At steady state in healthy subjects receiving 10 mg t.i.d. (n=18), peak plasma concentration was 25.9 ng/mL (range, 12.8-46.1 ng/mL), and area under the concentration-time (AUC) curve over an 8-hour dosing interval was 177 ng.hr/mL (range, 80-319 ng.hr/mL).

Cyclobenzaprine is extensively metabolized, and is excreted primarily as glucuronides via the kidney. Cytochromes P-450 3A4, 1A2, and, to a lesser extent, 2D6, mediate N-demethylation, one of the oxidative pathways for cyclobenzaprine. Cyclobenzaprine is eliminated quite slowly, with an effective half-life of 18 hours (range 8-37 hours; n=18); plasma clearance is 0.7 L/min.http://www.google.com/patents/EP2621475A1?cl=en

The plasma concentration of cyclobenzaprine is generally higher in the elderly and in patients with hepatic impairment.

(See PRECAUTIONS, Use in the Elderly and PRECAUTIONS, Impaired Hepatic Function.)
Elderly

In a pharmacokinetic study in elderly individuals (≥65yrs old), mean (n=10) steady-state cyclobenzaprine AUC values were approximately 1.7 fold (171.0 ng.hr/mL, range 96.1-255.3) higher than those seen in a group of eighteen younger adults (101.4 ng.hr/mL, range 36.1-182.9) from another study. Elderly male subjects had the highest observed mean increase, approximately 2.4 fold (198.3 ng.hr/mL, range 155.6-255.3 versus 83.2 ng.hr/mL, range 41.1-142.5 for younger males) while levels in elderly females were increased to a much lesser extent, approximately 1.2 fold (143.8 ng.hr/mL, range 96.1-196.3 versus 115.9 ng.hr/mL, range 36.1-182.9 for younger females).

In light of these findings, therapy with Flexeril in the elderly should be initiated with a 5 mg dose and titrated slowly upward.
Hepatic Impairment

In a pharmacokinetic study of sixteen subjects with hepatic impairment (15 mild, 1 moderate per Child-Pugh score), both AUC and Cmax were approximately double the values seen in the healthy control group. Based on the findings, Flexeril should be used with caution in subjects with mild hepatic impairment starting with the 5 mg dose and titrating slowly upward. Due to the lack of data in subjects with more severe hepatic insufficiency, the use of Flexeril in subjects with moderate to severe impairment is not recommended.

No significant effect on plasma levels or bioavailability of Flexeril or aspirin was noted when single or multiple doses of the two drugs were administered concomitantly. Concomitant administration of Flexeril and naproxen or diflunisal was well tolerated with no reported unexpected adverse effects. However combination therapy of Flexeril with naproxen was associated with more side effects than therapy with naproxen alone, primarily in the form of drowsiness. No well-controlled studies have been performed to indicate that Flexeril enhances the clinical effect of aspirin or other analgesics, or whether analgesics enhance the clinical effect of Flexeril in acute musculoskeletal conditions.
Clinical Studies

Eight double-blind controlled clinical studies were performed in 642 patients comparing Flexeril 10 mg, diazepam1, and placebo. Muscle spasm, local pain and tenderness, limitation of motion, and restriction in activities of daily living were evaluated. In three of these studies there was a significantly greater improvement with Flexeril than with diazepam, while in the other studies the improvement following both treatments was comparable.

Although the frequency and severity of adverse reactions observed in patients treated with Flexeril were comparable to those observed in patients treated with diazepam, dry mouth was observed more frequently in patients treated with Flexeril and dizziness more frequently in those treated with diazepam. The incidence of drowsiness, the most frequent adverse reaction, was similar with both drugs.

The efficacy of Flexeril 5 mg was demonstrated in two seven-day, double-blind, controlled clinical trials enrolling 1405 patients. One study compared Flexeril 5 mg and 10 mg t.i.d. to placebo; and a second study compared Flexeril 5 mg and 2.5 mg t.i.d. to placebo. Primary endpoints for both trials were determined by patient-generated data and included global impression of change, medication helpfulness, and relief from starting backache. Each endpoint consisted of a score on a 5-point rating scale (from 0 or worst outcome to 4 or best outcome). Secondary endpoints included a physician’s evaluation of the presence and extent of palpable muscle spasm.

Comparisons of Flexeril 5 mg and placebo groups in both trials established the statistically significant superiority of the 5 mg dose for all three primary endpoints at day 8 and, in the study comparing 5 and 10 mg, at day 3 or 4 as well. A similar effect was observed with Flexeril 10 mg (all endpoints). Physician-assessed secondary endpoints also showed that Flexeril 5 mg was associated with a greater reduction in palpable muscle spasm than placebo.

Analysis of the data from controlled studies shows that Flexeril produces clinical improvement whether or not sedation occurs.

cyclobenzaprine 10mg

Cyclobenzaprine HCl relieves skeletal muscle spasm of local origin without interfering with muscle function. It is ineffective in muscle spasm due to central nervous system disease.

Cyclobenzaprine reduced or abolished skeletal muscle hyperactivity in several animal models. Animal studies indicate that cyclobenzaprine does not act at the neuromuscular junction or directly on skeletal muscle. Such studies show that cyclobenzaprine acts primarily within the central nervous system at brain stem as opposed to spinal cord levels, although its action on the latter may contribute to its overall skeletal muscle relaxant activity. Evidence suggests that the net effect of cyclobenzaprine is a reduction of tonic somatic motor activity, influencing both gamma (γ) and alpha (α) motor systems.

Pharmacological studies in animals showed a similarity between the effects of cyclobenzaprine and the structurally related tricyclic antidepressants, including reserpine antagonism, norepinephrine potentiation, potent peripheral and central anticholinergic effects, and sedation. Cyclobenzaprine caused slight to moderate increase in heart rate in animals.

Pharmacokinetics

Estimates of mean oral bioavailability of cyclobenzaprine range from 33% to 55%. Cyclobenzaprine exhibits linear pharmacokinetics over the dose range 2.5 mg to 10 mg, and is subject to enterohepatic circulation. It is highly bound to plasma proteins. Drug accumulates when dosed three times a day, reaching steady state within 3-4 days at plasma concentrations about four-fold higher than after a single dose. At steady state in healthy subjects receiving 10 mg t.i.d. (n=18), peak plasma concentration was 25.9 ng/mL (range, 12.8-46.1 ng/mL), and area under the concentration-time (AUC) curve over an 8-hour dosing interval was 177 ng•hr/mL (range, 80-319 ng•hr/mL).

Cyclobenzaprine is extensively metabolized, and is excreted primarily as glucuronides via the kidney. Cytochromes P-450 3A4, 1A2, and, to a lesser extent, 2D6, mediate N-demethylation, one of the oxidative pathways for cyclobenzaprine. Cyclobenzaprine is eliminated quite slowly, with an effective half-life of 18 hours (range 8-37 hours; n=18); plasma clearance is 0.7 L/min.

The plasma concentration of cyclobenzaprine is generally higher in the elderly and in patients with hepatic impairment (see PRECAUTIONS, Use in the Elderly and PRECAUTIONS, Impaired Hepatic Function).

Elderly

In a pharmacokinetic study in elderly individuals (≥65 yrs old), mean (n=10) steady state cyclobenzaprine AUC values were approximately 1.7-fold (171.0 ng•hr/mL, range 96.1-255.3) higher than those seen in a group of eighteen younger adults (101.4 ng•hr/mL, range 36.1-182.9) from another study. Elderly male subjects had the highest observed mean increase, approximately 2.4-fold (198.3 ng•hr/mL, range 155.6-255.3 versus 83.2 ng•hr/mL, range 41.1-142.5 for younger males) while levels in elderly females were increased to a much lesser extent, approximately 1.2-fold (143.8 ng•hr/mL, range 96.1-196.3 versus 115.9 ng•hr/mL, range 36.1-182.9 for younger females).

In light of these findings, therapy with cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets in the elderly should be initiated with a 5 mg dose and titrated slowly upward.

Hepatic Impairment

In a pharmacokinetic study of sixteen subjects with hepatic impairment (15 mild, 1 moderate per Child-Pugh score), both AUC and Cmax were approximately double the values seen in the healthy control group. Based on the findings, cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets should be used with caution in subjects with mild hepatic impairment starting with the 5 mg dose and titrating slowly upward. Due to the lack of data in subjects with more severe hepatic insufficiency, the use of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets in subjects with moderate to severe impairment is not recommended.

No significant effect on plasma levels or bioavailability of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets or aspirin was noted when single or multiple doses of the two drugs were administered concomitantly. Concomitant administration of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets and naproxen or diflunisal was well tolerated with no reported unexpected adverse effects. However combination therapy of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets with naproxen was associated with more side effects than therapy with naproxen alone, primarily in the form of drowsiness. No well-controlled studies have been performed to indicate that cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets enhance the clinical effect of aspirin or other analgesics, or whether analgesics enhance the clinical effect of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets in acute musculoskeletal conditions.

Clinical Studies

Eight double-blind controlled clinical studies were performed in 642 patients comparing cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride 10 mg, diazepam, and placebo. Muscle spasm, local pain and tenderness, limitation of motion, and restriction in activities of daily living were evaluated. In three of these studies there was a significantly greater improvement with cyclobenzaprine than with diazepam, while in the other studies the improvement following both treatments was comparable.

Although the frequency and severity of adverse reactions observed in patients treated with cyclobenzaprine were comparable to those observed in patients treated with diazepam, dry mouth was observed more frequently in patients treated with cyclobenzaprine and dizziness more frequently in those treated with diazepam. The incidence of drowsiness, the most frequent adverse reaction, was similar with both drugs.

The efficacy of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 5 mg was demonstrated in two seven-day, double-blind, controlled clinical trials enrolling 1405 patients. One study compared cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 5 and 10 mg t.i.d. to placebo; and a second study compared cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 5 and 2.5 mg t.i.d. to placebo. Primary endpoints for both trials were determined by patient-generated data and included global impression of change, medication helpfulness, and relief from starting backache. Each endpoint consisted of a score on a 5-point rating scale (from 0 or worst outcome to 4 or best outcome). Secondary endpoints included a physician’s evaluation of the presence and extent of palpable muscle spasm.

Comparisons of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 5 mg and placebo groups in both trials established the statistically significant superiority of the 5 mg dose for all three primary endpoints at day 8 and, in the study comparing 5 and 10 mg, at day 3 or 4 as well. A similar effect was observed with cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 10 mg (all endpoints). Physician-assessed secondary endpoints also showed that cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 5 mg was associated with a greater reduction in palpable muscle spasm than placebo.

Analysis of the data from controlled studies shows that cyclobenzaprine produces clinical improvement whether or not sedation occurs.

Surveillance Program

A post-marketing surveillance program was carried out in 7607 patients with acute musculoskeletal disorders, and included 297 patients treated with cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride tablets 10 mg for 30 days or longer. The overall effectiveness of cyclobenzaprine was similar to that observed in the double-blind controlled studies; the overall incidence of adverse effects was less (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).

flexeril 10mg

I’ve been taking flexeril forever (or two years, which ever comes first) and it really does cause dry mouth symptoms. I’ve found this to come and go as you continue the use, but that symptom has never woken me up at night, oddly enough.

I would suggest that you take it about an hour or 45 minutes before bedtime – whatever amount of time it takes to make you really sleepy – and then right before you lay down to sleep, drink a bunch of water. I would take (and count) 10 solid gulps of water right before I layed down to sleep and that seemed to work for me.

Also, until your body gets used to it, keep the water on your nightstand so if and when you wake up, take a drink then go back to sleep.

I don’t know if this will work for you, but this is what I’ve done and it’s worked for me. Meds are so difficult because each one works different with each one of us and it can be such a trial and error process.

Flexeril

It has been prescribed to me by 2 different surgeons. It just dosen’t do anything for me. Diazepam works best for me. But I don’t take it very often. Seems like the surgeons sure do believe in the flexeril though.
Good luck, Jim

Click my name to see my Medical history
You get what you get, not what you deserve……I stole that from Susan (rip)
Today is yours to embrace…….. for tomorrow, who knows what might be

Biotene is a toothpaste, a mouthwash and a gel that is meant to help dry mouth. It is not a perfect fix but it helps. You can find it at most any store that sells toothpaste, doesn’t require a script or anything.

The gel is a little weird, but helps if used at bedtime.


My meds. at times make me feel like I have glue in my mouth. I seriously have issues talking it is so bad. I am a dedicated BYOB! lol I bring my own bottle everywhere – of water lol Wink

I have it in my purse everywhere I go, in stores and everywhere. I never know when the dryness will hit me.

I like others here have never had it wake me up though.

Wish you the best Smile

Cyclobenzaprine

Medical use

After sustaining an injury, muscle spasms may occur to stabilize the affected body part and prevent further damage. They also generate pain. Cyclobenzaprine is FDA-approved to treat such muscle spasms associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions.[3] It decreases pain in the first two weeks,[4][7] peaking in the first few days, but has no proven benefit after two weeks.[4][8] Since no benefit is proven beyond that, therapy should not be continued long-term.[9] It is not useful for spasticity due to neurologic conditions such as cerebral palsy.[9][10]

Cyclobenzaprine has also shown effectiveness in the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms, with a report of 4.8 patients needing treatment for each (1) patient reporting pain reduction (but no change in fatigue or tender points).[11]

Some experts believe that cyclobenzaprine should be avoided in elderly patients, because it can cause confusion, delirium, and cognitive impairment.[12][13]

Side effects

Meta-analysis studies have found significantly increased rates of drowsiness (38% of patients), dry mouth (24%), dizziness (10%), and adverse events of any kind in patients taking cyclobenzaprine versus placebo.[8] Drowsiness and dry mouth appear to intensify with increasing dose.[14]

The sedative effects of cyclobenzaprine are likely due to its antagonistic effect on histamine, serotonin, and muscarinic receptors. Agitation is a common side effect observed especially in the elderly. In general, the National Committee for Quality Assurance recommends avoiding the use of cyclobenzaprine in the elderly because of the potential for more severe side effects.[15] Treatment protocols and support should follow the same as for any structurally related tricyclic, such as tricyclic antidepressants.[16][dead link]

Overdose

The most common effects of overdose are drowsiness and tachycardia.[3] Rare but potentially critical complications are cardiac arrest, cardiac dysrhythmias, severe hypotension, seizures, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome.[3] Life-threatening overdose is rare,[3] however, as the median lethal dose is about 338 mg/kg in mice and 425 mg/kg in rats.[3] The potential harm is increased when central nervous system depressants and antidepressants are also used; deliberate overdose often includes alcohol among other drugs.[3]

Interactions

Cyclobenzaprine has major contraindications with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). At least one study also found increased risk of serotonin syndrome when cyclobenzaprine was taken with the serotonergic drugs duloxetine or phenelzine.[17]

These substances may interact with cyclobenzaprine:

  • Alcohol
  • Central nervous system depressants (e.g. opioids, benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepines, phenothiazines, carbamates, barbiturates)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants may increase the chance of side effects.
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors taken within two weeks of cyclobenzaprine may result in serious, life-threatening side effects.[9]

If co-administered with opioids, the dose of one or both medicines should be reduced accordingly. The patient should be monitored for excessive sedation.